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Improving my writing through reading: Simons (2014)

Linda Skitka recently shared a great exercise for helping students improve their writing.* This "reverse engineering" exercise sounds helpful. I can feel when writing is executed well and when it is not; however, I have never tried to verbalize why the writing is executed well. Thus, before asking my students to complete this exercise, I thought I would … Continue reading Improving my writing through reading: Simons (2014)

Scientific Theories and Improvised Explosive Devises

Dr. Harris was a skillful instructor. He explained abstract concepts in a way that made his students feel as if they were part of an intelligent conversation rather than pupil-shaped furniture in the room being lectured to. His most impassioned lecture was on testing scientific theories: To the students in the WSU Social Psychology program, … Continue reading Scientific Theories and Improvised Explosive Devises

Is this effect smaller than the SESOI? Evaluating the hostile priming effect in the Srull & Wyer (1979) RRR

I was recently involved with a Registered Replication Report (RRR) of Srull & Wyer (1979). In this RRR, several independent labs collected data to test the “hostile priming effect”: An effect where exposing participants to stimuli related to the construct of hostility causes participants to subsequently judge ambiguous information as being more hostile. The results … Continue reading Is this effect smaller than the SESOI? Evaluating the hostile priming effect in the Srull & Wyer (1979) RRR

Multi-Site Collaborations Provide Robust Tests of Theories

According to Popper (1959) "We can say of a theory, provided it is falsifiable, that it rules out, or prohibits, not merely one occurrence, but always at least one event" (p. 70). I argue that, all else being equal, multi-site collaborations more robustly test theories than studies done at a single site at a single time by … Continue reading Multi-Site Collaborations Provide Robust Tests of Theories

The meaningfulness of lab-based aggression research

I consider myself to be an aggression researcher. And I often use lab-based research methods. So I guess I consider myself a lab-based aggression researcher. One of the things I often worry about is whether I am producing meaningful, informative, credible research that helps us understand "real-world" aggression. Or am I merely playing a game … Continue reading The meaningfulness of lab-based aggression research

The benefits of "crowdsourced" research

What is crowdsourced research?  Briefly, “crowdsourced” research involves several individual researchers who coordinate their resources to accomplish goals that would be difficult to achieve individually. Although there are several different ways in which researchers can work collaboratively, the current blog is focusing on projects where several different researchers each collect data that will be pooled … Continue reading The benefits of "crowdsourced" research