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lions and tigers and academic writing…oh my

  Here's a familiar story: A scientist sits down to write a manuscript and, rather than creating a crisp and coherent presentation of information, meanders aimlessly for several pages instead. This story is a tragedy. How can we avoid such tragic situations? Try thinking of your manuscripts like a great novel or a blockbuster movie. … Continue reading lions and tigers and academic writing…oh my

Improving my writing through reading: Simons (2014)

Linda Skitka recently shared a great exercise for helping students improve their writing.* This "reverse engineering" exercise sounds helpful. I can feel when writing is executed well and when it is not; however, I have never tried to verbalize why the writing is executed well. Thus, before asking my students to complete this exercise, I thought I would … Continue reading Improving my writing through reading: Simons (2014)

Scientific Theories and Improvised Explosive Devises

Dr. Harris was a skillful instructor. He explained abstract concepts in a way that made his students feel as if they were part of an intelligent conversation rather than pupil-shaped furniture in the room being lectured to. His most impassioned lecture was on testing scientific theories: To the students in the WSU Social Psychology program, … Continue reading Scientific Theories and Improvised Explosive Devises

Is this effect smaller than the SESOI? Evaluating the hostile priming effect in the Srull & Wyer (1979) RRR

I was recently involved with a Registered Replication Report (RRR) of Srull & Wyer (1979). In this RRR, several independent labs collected data to test the “hostile priming effect”: An effect where exposing participants to stimuli related to the construct of hostility causes participants to subsequently judge ambiguous information as being more hostile. The results … Continue reading Is this effect smaller than the SESOI? Evaluating the hostile priming effect in the Srull & Wyer (1979) RRR

Multi-Site Collaborations Provide Robust Tests of Theories

According to Popper (1959) "We can say of a theory, provided it is falsifiable, that it rules out, or prohibits, not merely one occurrence, but always at least one event" (p. 70). I argue that, all else being equal, multi-site collaborations more robustly test theories than studies done at a single site at a single time by … Continue reading Multi-Site Collaborations Provide Robust Tests of Theories